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October 27, 2017 | Paul D. Sheriff

Pluralsight Courses by Fairway Technologies

You may not know, but two principals at Fairway Technologies are published authors at Pluralsight.com. Pluralsight is the leader in online technology courses. Paul D. Sheriff and Michael Krasowski have created over 20 courses covering topics from Project Management, Estimation to WPF, MVC and Angular. Check out the complete list of the courses produced to date.

August 28, 2017 | Paul D. Sheriff

Displaying a Wait Message on an MVC Page

When a user clicks on a button on a web page, there can be a delay between posting back to the server and the next action that happens on the screen. The problem with this delay is the user may not know they actually clicked on the button and tries to hit the button again. It is important to give immediate feedback to the user so they know that the application is doing something. This post will show you how to disable the button, display a pop-up message and gray out the background before the post back happens thereby providing feedback to our user.

August 21, 2012 | Jeff Johnson

Adding Images to Select Lists in MVC3

Preface

At my last company, I was working on moving a legacy ASP.NET WebForms application to MVC3. During the migration process, we had to implement some features in our legacy ASP.NET WebForms app (y’know, to stay competitive and stuff). Our WebForms guy did some fairly slick UI work – he leveraged the Telerik controls we purchased to create some dropdown lists that had icons next to each item in the list.

During one of our standups, my manager asked “Jeff, you’re working in an area related to [feature x], right?”

“Yeah…” I replied sheepishly, knowing what was coming next.

“Do you think you could make the dropdown list on your MVC screen look like the existing WebForms screen?”

Without really thinking, I replied with my de facto silly answer: “I’m a programmer – I can do anything! I’ll look into it and see what I can find.”

Before continuing any further, I’d like to throw out a word of caution: “I can do anything” is the worst possible answer a developer can give. Period. I’d even go so far as to say that “I can do anything” is the worst possible combination and sequence of words in the English language. Your manager/product manager/in-charge person will most likely take you seriously, regardless of your tone. If you find that infernal phrase on the tip of your tongue, take a deep breath and count to 10. Then say something else. Please learn from my mistake and consider yourself warned.

But I digress.

So, off to the Google-net I went.

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