The Fairway Technologies Blog

blog
July 24, 2018 | Paul D. Sheriff

Getting Started with PouchDB - Part 4

In the last three blog posts in this series, you created a PouchDB database and modified documents within it. You learned to search for documents within the database using allDocs() and find(). In this fourth part of our ongoing series on PouchDB, you learn to use map queries and the query() method.

July 9, 2018 | Paul D. Sheriff

Getting Started with PouchDB - Part 3

In the last two blog posts, you have been introduced to the PouchDB NoSQL database. You learned to create a new database, modify documents within that database, and retrieve documents using the allDocs(). Now that you have inserted several documents into your PouchDB database, you might wish to retrieve documents based on data in fields other than the _id property. In this third part of our on-going blog posts on PouchDB, you learn to use the find() plug-in to perform queries on any property in your documents.

May 22, 2018 | Paul D. Sheriff

How to upload Small Files using Angular

Sometimes, you may need to upload files to your server via an Angular application. There are a few different methods you may use. Today, I am going to present a method that works well for small files up to about two megabytes in size. In this blog, you build two projects: a .NET Core Web API project and an Angular project. You build these two projects from scratch using the Angular CLI, .NET Core, and Visual Studio Code editor.

April 30, 2018 | Paul D. Sheriff

Get a User's Location within a Web Application

Have you ever need to display your user's location on a map in your web application? HTML 5 adds a geolocation object to help make locating the current user's latitude and longitude quick and easy. Once you have this information, you can use a map API such as Google Maps or Microsoft's Bing Maps to display that latitude and longitude on a graphical map. This blog post explores how to use this new object to get a user's current position.

February 6, 2018 | Paul D. Sheriff

Security in Angular - Part 1

In most business applications, you are going to want to disable, or make invisible, different features such as menu items, buttons and other UI items, based on who is logged in and what roles or permissions they have. Angular does not have anything built-in to help you with this, so you must create it yourself. There are two different pieces to security you must worry about with Angular applications. First, you must develop the client-side security, which is the subject of this article. Second, you must secure your Web API calls, which will be the subject of another article.

June 13, 2013 | Lorrie Hunsaker

Fairway Unveils Redesigned Website

New site delivers multiple enhancements for a richer user experience

New Call-to-action
New Call-to-action